The Inheritors: Sex and balance sheets

Naked woman being filmed in bed
Sex, TV camera and Robbins name dominate cover of The Inheritors.

The Inheritors combines steamy sex with stultifying descriptions of multi-million dollar financial deals.

To make things worse, Harold Robbins’ odd organization makes following the story difficult.

Steve Gaunt and Sam Benjamin are frenemies and business partners. Steve and Sam each have three-track minds: Women, booze, and business.

Needless to say there’s not a lot of character for Robbins to develop.

Robbins opens the novel with a chapter about the morning of a spring day in which Steve and Sam talk about things that mean nothing to readers.

Books one and two relate events of 1955-60 in New York from the viewpoints of Steve and Sam respectively.

Then there’s a chapter about the afternoon of the spring day.

Next books three and four relate events of 1966-65 in Hollywood from the viewpoints of Steve and Sam respectively.

Sam, the homely fat guy, is the more interesting of the two. The suave Steve with his nose in a balance sheet is not stimulating company for any reader.

What little interest there is in the novel is in the cultural history of how television disrupted the film industry, embraced rock music, and metamorphosed into the communications industry.

The Inheritors by Harold Robbins
Pocket Book Edition, 1971. 373 p. paper. 1969 bestseller #4. My grade: C-.

© 2017 Linda Gorton Aragoni

The Love Machine: a novel about television

Female gender symbol fills front cover of The Love Machine
The Love Machine is a novel that’s not afraid to be noticed.

The Love Machine has a lot of action, most of which occurs in beds. Nevertheless, it’s a far better novel than I expected from the author of the appalling Valley of the Dolls.

The alpha male in the novel is Robin Stone, who comes out of TV news and pushes his way to temporarily dominate a TV network.

There are lots of women in the novel, Amanda, Maggie, and Judith being the three who lend their names to the novel’s sections.

Amanda, the blonde, dies.

Maggie, the brunette, goes into films.

I don’t remember Judith’s hair color or what happens to her. By the time she appeared, I’d lost what little interest I’d had in Robin’s sex partners.

The most interesting part of the novel is the mystery of why Robin dislikes brunettes.

Under hypnosis, Robin learns he is adopted; his dark-haired German mother was a prostitute who was murdered by a customer.

After his foster mother dies, Robin tries to find his real family, but he can’t find any of her relatives.

Whether Robin sorted out his childhood trauma, readers never learn.

Susann wraps up the novel with the consummate expertise of a writer who won the Best Dressed Woman in Television Award four times.

The Love Machine by Jacqueline Susann
Grove Press, 1969. paper. 511 p. 1968 bestseller #3. My grade: C+.

© 2017 Linda Gorton Aragoni