The Tenth Insight (novel)

lush, romantic forest scene with waterfall and lakeIn The Tenth Insight, James Redfield picks up the religious adventure he began in The Celestine Prophesy.

Seeking a friend who has disappeared, Nameless Narrator arrives at a small Appalachian village outside a national forest in time to make eye contact with a man he sees walking away from him.

Nameless follows the man.

Something bad is happening in the forest. An energy company is trying to develop a new, clean energy source and get a monopoly on it.

Nameless realized there is a one-time opportunity to change the world if cheap energy can be made available to everyone in the world. A handful of good guys band together to prevent the company from getting a monopoly.

Easier said than done. There are armed guards around the site.

Even after the good guys have “cleared [their] residual emotions and amplified [their] energy and shared [their] Birth Visions,” they still haven’t “seen the World Vision.”

Their energy is almost totally deflated, but eventually they are able to “lift the whole valley to a higher vibratory pattern.”

Readers may want to wait for a movie version of The Tenth Insight. Imagine the thrill of seeing Robert Downey Jr. tell Don Cheadle, “Find the World Vision and resolve the polarization.”

The Tenth Insight: Holding the Vision
Further Adventures of the Celestine Prophesy
By James Redfield
Warner Brooks. ©1996. 236 p.
1996 bestseller #10; my grade: D

©2020 Linda G. Aragoni

Overload: Inside the power industry

A blacked-out city and list of Arthur Hailey's other bestsellers are on the dust jacket of "Overload".
O in Overload shows city blackout.

Overload, like several other Arthur Hailey’s bestsellers, goes inside an industry the public takes for granted and reveals the internal problems the public rarely sees—the ones that could change their lives.

Overload is about the fictitious Golden State Power and Light, which its critics say is amassing huge profits to the benefit of stockholders and the detriment of electric and gas customers.

Nim Goldman is the too-outspoken assistant to GSP&L’s chairman. Goldman knows California production facilities are barely adequate to meet the ’70s energy demands. Without more energy generation and diversified energy sources, Goldman predicts an electrical famine within a decade.

Davey Birdsong, a colorful and dynamic activist, leads the popular opposition to anything that raises utility rates. The Sequoia Club has formed an uneasy, and secret, alliance with Birdsong.

Goldman has the usual discretely described sexual conquests typical of a Hailey leading man.

But Overload is unusual in two ways: Goldman is more sexually predatory than the usual Hailey hero, and two of the novel’s sub plots are awkwardly wedged into the main tale.

Despite its flaws, Overload is a page-turner whose picture of America’s energy problems and the inefficiency of government regulation of the power industry are still valid.

Overload by Arthur Hailey
Doubleday, ©1979. 515 p.
1979 bestseller #3 My grade: B+

©2018 Linda Gorton Aragoni