The Aquitaine Progression

 “The Aquitaine Progression” dust jacket is black with only small circle in which action is visible.
Converse waits for a cable car

The Aquitaine Progression, like Robert Ludlum’s other thrillers, is an incredibly complex multi-layered story that demands all a reader’s attention.

The main character is Joel Converse, an international lawyer and former Navy pilot. During the Vietnam War, Converse had been imprisoned by the North Vietnamese, escaping to freedom on his third attempt.

The novel’s action is too complicated to relate but the premise at the novel’s core is too believable to be forgotten.

A handful of highly placed military men—in the U.S., France, West Germany, England, Israel, and South Africa are planning to, in effect, take over Europe and Europe’s former colonies in the Americas.

Their plan is to take advantage of peaceful demonstrations to create chaos. The conspirators have trained men ready to attacking both the demonstrators and the demonstrator’s opponents without revealing their own identifies.

In the confusion, the conspirators will assassinate the leaders of the major democracies, expecting that lawlessness they’ve sparked will make people beg for strong military leaders to restore order: The military men have the trained troops and the munitions needed to do that.

Although Ludlum was writing in the ‘80s, it takes little imagination to see how the plot he imagines could play out today.

The Aquitaine Progression by Robert Ludlum
Random House. ©1984. 647 p.
1984 bestseller #2; My grade: A

©2019 Linda Gorton Aragoni

 

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Linda G. Aragoni

I make big ideas simple for learners. In eight sentences, 34 words, I taught teens and adults to write competently. Now I'm writing guides to turn willing volunteers into great nursing home visitors.

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